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Samantha Prahalis' potential was evident early. As a seventh-grader, Prahalis started for her high school team. From a young age, Prahalis worked on ballhandling drills that could help her evade opponents, and make highlight-reel plays. As a point guard, she plays a different kind of game than almost any of her predecessors in the WNBA, forcing observers to cross genders for comparisons like Pete Maravich.

Samantha Prahalis.
Jeff Zelevansky/Getty Images

Make no mistake, though - Prahalis' game is about more than just flash. She was chosen Big Ten Player of the Year by coaches and the media this season, having averaged 19.8 points and 6.3 assists per game. More passer than scorer by nature, Prahalis had no choice but to be more aggressive offensively after Jantel Lavender graduated, and she had 34 points against Wisconsin and 42 against Minnesota in Big Ten play. She became the conference's all-time assist leader and the second player in Division I history with 2,000 career points and 900 assists. However, Prahalis' career ended on a down note when she had just nine points in a loss to Florida in the Round of 64 during the NCAA tournament

  • Court Vision - Prahalis sees passes that other players don't, and completes ones others would never attempt. As a result, she averaged 6.8 assists for her career, including 8.0 as a sophomore.
  • Creating Shots - Not a great shooter, and not exceptional at getting to the basket, Prahalis nonetheless uses her ballhandling ability and the threat of the pass to set herself up for good scoring opportunities.
  • Toughness - Prahalis played football growing up, and still has that kind of mindset, which allows her to play more physically then her frame would indicate. She's fiery, which can work to her team's benefit or detriment depending on the situation.
  • Size - Toughness aside, Prahalis will be going against bigger players on a regular basis in the WNBA at 5-7.
  • Decision Making - At times, Prahalis' aggressive style of play can translate into costly mistakes. As a sophomore, she averaged 4.1 turnovers per game, though she reined in those miscues somewhat by her senior year.

"Top point guard in the draft. Can score. Has great vision. Really good basketball instincts."

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