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Dallas Diamonds
The Dallas Diamonds were one of six WBL expansion teams that began play in the 1979-80 season. Future Shock coach Greg Williams took over the head coaching reins of the team for the 1980-81 season. With another future Shock coach, Nancy Lieberman, as his star player, Williams led the Diamonds to the 1980-81 WBL Finals where they fell to the Nebraska Wranglers three games to two.


Dallas Diamonds (2)
The Women's American Basketball Association lasted just one season (1983-84), but future Shock coach Greg Williams helped lead the Dallas Diamonds to the WABA Championship, earning coach of the year honors in the process.


Dallas Mavericks
Future Shock Assistant Coach Sonny Allen, who would later go on to be the head coach of the Sacramento Monarchs (1999-2001), was an assistant coach with the Mavericks from 1996-97.


Davidson, Bill


Davidson
Recognized as one of the most successful owners in professional basketball, Detroit Pistons Managing Partner William Davidson can be credited for a majority of the success the Pistons and Shock have enjoyed. Under his direction, the Pistons have won three NBA Championships (1989, 1990, 2004) and the Shock have won two WNBA titles (2003, 2006).

During the 2003-04 sports year, he became the first owner in sports history to win championships with there different professional leagues. The Pistons returned to glory, winning the organization’s third championship in franchise history, the Tampa Bay Lightning won their first Stanley Cup, and the Shock won their first WNBA Championship.


Dayton, University Of
After his coaching career with the Shock came to an end, Greg Williams served as an assistant coach with the University of Dayton women's basketball team from 2003 through 2005.


DeForge, Anna (2000)


DeForge
A graduate of the University of Nebraska, DeForge played for the ABL's San Jose Lasers in 1998-99 after the Lasers made her the sixth pick in the second round (No. 16 overall) in the 1998 ABL Draft. After the ABL ceased operations, DeForge signed with the WNBA and the league allocated her to the Detroit Shock after the 2000 WNBA Draft. After one season with Detroit, DeForge was traded to the Houston Comets for Jennifer Rizzotti on April 21, 2001. Houston cut her before the start of the regular season, and DeForge bounced around from training camp to training camp before finding a home with the Phoenix Mercury on May 9, 2003. She spent three years with the Mercury before being traded to the Indiana Fever on February 3, 2006 in exchange for Kelly Miller. After two years with the Fever, DeForge signed a free agent contract with the Minnesota Lynx on February 19, 2008.

DeForge Bio and Statistics


Delaware, Universsity of
The University of Delaware was established in 1743 and its women’s basketball program began in the 1971-72 academic year. The Blue Hens have advanced to two NCAA Tournaments over the years. Detroit Shock 2007 free agent signee Tyresa Smith player collegiately at the University of Delaware.


Delta Center, The
The Delta Center served as the home court of the Utah Starzz during their five years in the WNBA before the franchise moved to San Antonio. The Shock are 3-1 all-time at the Delta Center.


DePaul University
Founded in 1898, the DePaul University is a private college located in Chicago, Illinois. The women’s basketball program, established in 1974-75, has 11 NCAA tournament appearances to its credit. Two Blue Demons have played for the Shock - Mfon Udoka and Lenae Williams.


Detroit, Uniersity Of
Former Shock assistant coach Laurie Byrd was an assistant coach for three seasons at the University of Detroit prior to joining the Shock coaching staff.


Dorsey, Latasha
After finishing her collegiate career at Louisiana State University, Dorsey went undrafted in 1999, signing with the WNBA as a free agent and being assigned to the Shock on May 6, 1999. Detroit waived Dorsey on May 27, 1999.


Draft, 1979 NBA
The Cleveland Cavaliers selected future Shock had coach and Pistons Bad Boy Bill Laimbeer in the third round (No. 21 overall) of the 1979 NBA Draft.


Draft, 1980 NBA
The Washington Bullets selected future Shock coach and Pistons Bad Boy Rick Mahorn in the second round (No. 12 overall) of the 1980 NBA Draft.


Draft, 1996 ABL
The 1996 ABL Draft had three segments to it – Premier Player Assignments that made up the first two "rounds" of the draft, a regular draft which made up rounds three through 10, and a series of Alternate Selections that allowed teams to add three other players to each of their rosters.

Several future members of the Detroit Shock were a part of this draft – Cindy Brown, assigned to the Seattle Reign and Jennifer Azzi and Val Whiting, assigned to the San Jose Lasers; Katie Smith, selected by the Columbus Quest with the fifth pick (No. 21 Overall) in the third round; Joy Holmes, selected by the Seattle Reign with the second pick (No. 58 Overall) in the eighth round; Shannon Johnson, chosen with the fifth pick (No. 61 Overall) in the eighth round by the Quest; Andrea Stinson, selected by the New England Blizzard with the fourth pick (No. 68 Overall) in the ninth round; and Laurie Byrd, chosen as an Alternate Selection by the Atlanta Glory.


Draft, 1997 ABL
Several future members of the Detroit Shock were selected in the ABL Draft on May 5, 1997 – Astou Ndiaye-Diatta by the Seattle Reign with the fourth pick in the second round (No. 13 Overall); Kedra Holland-Corn by the San Jose Lasers with the sixth pick in the second round (No. 15 Overall); Elaine Powell by the Portland Power with the second pick of the third round (No. 20 Overall); and Laurie Byrd by the San Jose Lasers with the sixth pick of the fifth round (No. 42 Overall).


Draft, 1998 ABL
Several future members of the Detroit Shock were selected in the ABL Draft on May 5, 1998 – Barbara Farris by the New England Blizzard with the third pick in the first round; Tausha Mills with the nine pick in the first round by the Chicago Condors; Anna DeForge by the San Jose Lasers with the sixth pick in the second round (No. 16 Overall); and Laurie Byrd by New England with the eighth pick in the third round (No. 28 Overall).


Draft, 1998 ABL Expansion
The ABL held an Expansion Draft on April 16,1998 to stock the Nashville and Chicago franchises. Future Shock forward Joy Holmes of the Seattle Reign was selected by the Nashville Noise with the second pick in the second round of the draft.


Draft, 1997 WNBA Elite
The 1997 WNBA Elite Draft was ths second in a four-stage roster stocking process held prior to the league's inaugural season. The first stage of initial player allocationssaw the league assign two players to each of the eight WNBA teams on January 22, 1997. The second stage, the WNBA Elite Draft, was a two-round draft of players that were no longer in college held on February 27, 1997. The third stage, the 1997 WNBA Draft held on April 28, 1997, was a more traditional draft in that it included players who completed their college eligibility in 1997. the fourth stage consisted of a Final Roster Allocation on May 22, 1997.

Four players who were selected in the WNBA Elite Draft eventually played for or impacted the Shock - Wanda Guyton, who was selected by the Houston Comets with the fifth pick in the first round, would play for the Shock in 1999; Wendy Palmer-Daniel, who was selected by the Utah Starzz with the first pick in the second round (No. 9 Overall), would play parts of four seasons in Detroit from 1999-2002; Lynette Woodard, who was selected by the Cleveland Rockers with the second pick in the second round (No. 10 Overall), would play for the Shock in 1999 after being selected in the 1998 WNBA Expansion Draft; and Nancy Lieberman-Cline, who was selected by the Phoenix Mercury with the seventh pick in the second round (No. 15 Overall), would go on to become the Shock's first head coach and general manager, holding those posts from 1998-2000.


Draft, 1998 WNBA Expansion
The 1998 WNBA Expansion Draft was held on April 28, 1998 to help the Detroit Shock and the Washington Mystics stock their rosters for their inaugural seasons. The Detroit Shock selected Rhonda Blades, Tajama Abraham, Tara Williams and Lynette Woodard in the draft. Blades, Abraham and Woodard would all make the Shock roster in 1998.


Draft, 1999 WNBA Expansion
The 1999 WNBA Expansion Draft was held on April 6, 1999 to help stock the Minnesota Lynx and Orlando Miracle with players for their inaugural season. The Detroit Shock did not lose any players in the 1999 Expansion Draft.


Draft, 2000 WNBA Expansion
The 2000 WNBA Expansion Draft was held on December 15, 1999 to help stock the Indiana Fever, Miami Sol, Portland Fire and Seattle Storm with players for their inaugural season. The Indiana Fever selected Sandy Brondello off of the Shock roster in the second round (No. 8 Overall). Brondello was left exposed in the draft because she intended to miss the 2000 WNBA Season to train with the Australian National Team for the 2000 Olympic Games. The Miami Sol would select the Shock's Lesley Brown in the fifth round (No. 19 Overall). At the conclusion of the draft Indiana traded Brondello to Miami for Stephanie (White) McCarty, whom the Sol had selected in the second round (No. 6 Overall) of the 2000 WNBA Expansion Draft.


Draft, 2005 WNBA Expansion
The 2005 WNBA Expansion Draft was held on November 16, 2005 to help stock the Chicago Sky with players for its inaugural season. The 13 veteran WNBA teams could only lose one player in the draft, and the Sky selected Elaine Powell off of the Shock's roster.


Draft, 2008 WNBA Expansion
The 2008 WNBA Expansion Draft was held on February 6, 2008 to help stock the Atlanta Dream with players for its inaugural season. The 13 veteran WNBA teams could only lose one player in the draft, and the Sky selected Katie Feenstra off of the Shock's roster. That same day, the Dream also acquired Ivory Latta from the Shock in exchange for Expansion Draft selection LaToya Thomas and the 18th pick in the 2008 WNBA Draft.


Draft, 2003 WNBA Dispersal
The 2003 Dispersal Draft was held after the Miami Sol and Portland Fire ceased operation following the 2002 campaign. The remaining 14 teams participated in a one-round draft with teams choosing players in reverse order of their finish during the 2002 WNBA Season. The Shock had the first pick in the Dispersal Draft and selected Miami Sol center Ruth Riley.


Draft, 2004 WNBA Dispersal
The 2004 WNBA Dispersal Draft was held after the Cleveland Rockers ceased operations after seven years of WNBA competition. Teams chose players in inverse order of their 2003 regular season finish. The Detroit Shock held the thirteenth pick due to their first place finish and selected guard Jennifer Rizzotti. Rizzotti retired from the WNBA before ever suiting up for the Shock. This was actually the second time in her career that Rizzotti almost played in Detroit. She was part of a trade that saw the Shock send Anna DeForge to the Houston Comets on April 21, 2001 but she was traded to Cleveland May 27, 2001 in exchange for the Rockers' 2002 third round draft pick (No. 47 Overall). Future Shock forward LaToya Thomas was also selected in the 2004 Dispersal Draft by the San Antonio Silver Stars.


Draft, 2007 WNBA Dispersal
The 2007 WNBA Dispersal Draft was held after the Charlotte Sting ceased operations after 10 years of WNBA competition. Teams chose players in inverse order of their 2006 regular season finish. The Detroit Shock held the 11th pick, but elected not to select any players. Former Shock player Ayana Walker was selected by the Los Angeles Sparks with the 12th pick in the 2007 Dispersal Draft.


Draft, 1997 WNBA
The 1997 WNBA Draft, held on April 28, 1997, was the third stage in a four-part process employed to stock the original eight WNBA teams with players. The first stage was the Initial Player Allocations, the second was the WNBA Elite Draft, and the fourth was the Final Roster Allocations.

Although, the Detroit Shock didn't exist in 1997, two players who would later grace the team's roster were selected during the league's initial four-round draft: The Sacramento Monarchs selected future Shock assistant coach Pam McGee with the second overall pick in the first round; and the Cleveland Rockers made future Shock guard Merlakia Jones the fifth pick in the second round (No. 13 overall).


Draft, 1998 WNBA
The 1998 WNBA Draft was held on April 29, 1998. The Shock had four selections - the fourth pick in each round - with which to craft its inagural season roster. In the frst round, Detroit took Korie Hlede, in the second they chose Rachael Sporn, in the third they took Gergana Branzova and they closed out the draft by taking Sandy Brondello in the fourth.


Draft, 1999 WNBA
The WNBA held its 1999 Draft on May 4. The Shock had the fifth pick in each of the four rounds and used those picks to select Jennifer Azzi in the first round, Val Whiting in the second, Dominique Canty in the third and Astou Ndiaye in the fourth.

Two other future Shock players were taken in the 1999 WNBA Draft: the Sacramento Monarchs selected Kedra Holland-Corn with the second pick in the second round (No. 14 overall) and the Orlando Miracle chose Elaine Powell with the 14th pick in the fourth round (No. 50 overall).


Draft, 2000 WNBA
The Detroit Shock had five picks in the 2000 WNBA Draft, held on April 25, 2000, including two selections in the first round. The Shock tapped Edwina Brown with the third overall choice, Tamicha Jackson with the eighth overall selection, Madinah Slaise with the 12th pick in the second round (No. 28 overall), Chevonne Hammond with the 12th pick in the third round (No. 44 overall) and Cal Bouchard with the 12th pick in the fourth round (No. 60 overall).

The Washington Mystics selected future Shock center Tausha Mills with the second overall pick in the first round and the Portland Fire selected eventual Shock guard Stacey Thomas with the seventh pick in the second round (No. 23 overall).


Draft, 2001 WNBA
Detroit had the sixth overall pick in each of the four rounds of the 2001 WNBA Draft held on April 20, 2001. With those picks, they selected Deanna Nolan in the first round, Jae Kingi in the second round (No. 22 overall), Svetlana Volnaya in the third round (No. 38 overall), and Kelly Santos in the fourth round (No. 54 overall).

The Miami Sol made future Shock center Ruth Riley the fifth overall pick in the draft and the Indiana Fever made future Shock guard Niele Ivey the third pick in the second round of the draft (No. 19 overall).


Draft, 2002 WNBA
Detroit had six picks, including five of the first 22, in the 2002 WNBA Draft held on April 19, 2001. The Shock selected Swin Cash with the second pick in the first round, Lenae Williams with the second pick in the second round (No. 18 overall), Ayana Walker with the fourth pick in the second round (No. 20 overall), Jill Chapman with the fifth pick in the third round (No. 21 overall), Kathy Wambe with the sixth pick in the second round (No. 22 overall) and Ericka Haney with the 15th pick in the third round (No. 47 overall). Detroit did not have any picks in the fourth round.

The Charlotte Sting selected future Shock guard Sheila Lambert with the seventh overall pick in the draft, while the Miami Sol chose another future Shock guard in Tamara Moore with the 15th overall pick.


Draft, 2003 WNBA
In 2003, the WNBA reduced its annual draft, held on April 25, from four to three rounds. The Shock had the third and fifth overall picks which they used on Cheryl Ford and Kara Lawson, and the first pick in the third round (No. 26 overall) which they used to select Syreeta Bromfield.

The Phoenix Mercury made future Shock forward Plenette Pierson the fourth overall pick in the draft and selected future Shock center Petra Ujhelyi with the fourth pick in the second round (No. 16 overall). The Cleveland Rockers selected future Shock guard Latoya Thomas with the number one overall pick.


Draft, 2004 WNBA
Detroit had four picks in the 2004 WNBA Draft held on April 17, selecting Iciss Tillis with the 11th overall pick, Shereka Wright at No. 13 overall, Erika Valek with the 10th pick of the second round (No. 23 overall) and Jennifer Smith with the sixth pick in the third round (No. 32 overall).

The Phoenix Mercury selected future Shock guard Chandi Jones with the eighth overall pick and the Houston Comets chose future Shock center Stacy Stephens with the 11th pick in the third round (No. 37 overall).


Draft, 2005 WNBA
The Shock had four draft picks in the 2006 WNBA Draft held on April 16. In the first round, they selected Kara Braxton with the seventh overall pick and Dionnah Jackson with the 13th overall pick. With the seventh pick in the second round (No. 20 overall) they tapped Nikita Bell. And with the seventh pick In the third round (No. 33 overall), they chose Jenni Lingor.

The Connecticut Sun made future Shock center Katie Feenstra the eighth overall pick in the draft, while the Minnesota Lynx selected future Shock guard Jacqueline Batteast with the fourth pick in the second round (No. 17 overall) and the Phoenix Mercury chose future Shock guard Angelina Williams with the fifth pick in the second round (No. 18 overall).


Draft, 2006 WNBA
The 2006 WNBA Draft, held on April 5, was the first draft in the history of the league to be conducted away from the NBA Entertainment studios in Secaucus, New Jersey. The '06 version was held in Boston Massachusetts - site of the 2006 NCAA Women's Final Four. Detroit had just two picks in the draft using them on Ambrosia Anderson, whom they selected with the third pick in the second round (No. 17 overall) and Zane Teilane, whom they chose with the seventh pick in the third round (No. 35 overall).


Draft, 2007 WNBA
The 2007 WNBA Draft was held on April 4 in Cleveland, Ohio - site of the 2007 NCAA Women's Final Four. The Shock had just one pick in the draft, selecting University of North Carolina point guard Ivory Latta with the 11th pick in the first round.


Draft, 2008 WNBA
The 2008 WNBA Draft is scheduled for April 9 in Tampa, Florida - site of the 2008 NCAA Women's Final Four. As of February 25, 2008, the Shock have five picks in the draft - the fourth, acquired from the Seattle Storm in exchange for Swin Cash; the 11th, acquired as part of the Ruth Riley-Katie Feenstra trade with San Antonio; the 18th, acquired as part of the Ivory Latta-LaToya Thomas trade with the Atlanta Dream; the 28th; and the 42nd.


Duke University
Originally founded in 1838 as Brown School, Duke University is a private college located in Durham, North Carolina. In 1921 the school officially became known as Duke University. The Blue Devils began competing intercollegiately in women's basketball in 1975-76 and have played in the NCAA Tournament 13 times advancing to four Final Fours. Iciss Tillis played for both the Shock and the Blue Devils.


Duquesne University
Founded in 1878 as Pittsburgh Catholic College of the Holy Ghost, Duquesne University is located in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania and began intercollegiate women's basketball competition in 1975-76. Korie Hlede who played and coaches for the Shock, attended Duquesne.


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