Breaking Down the US Olympic Team Roster

ROSTER BREAKDOWN
By WNBA Team
  • Lynx: 3 players (Augustus, Moore, Whalen)
  • Sky: 2 players (Cash, Fowles)
  • Dream: 1 player (McCoughtry)
  • Fever: 1 player (Catchings)
  • Mercury: 1 player (Taurasi)
  • Sparks: 1 player (Parker)
  • Storm: 1 player (Bird)
  • Sun: 1 player (Charles)
  • By Olympic Appearances
  • 2 gold medals (2004, 2008): Bird, Catchings, Taurasi
  • 1 gold medal (2004): Cash
  • 1 gold medal (2008): Augustus, Parker, Fowles
  • By College
  • Connecticut: 5 players (Bird, Cash, Charles, Moore, Taurasi)
  • Tennessee: 2 players (Catchings, Parker)
  • LSU: 2 players (Augustus, Fowles)
  • Louisville: 1 player (McCoughtry)
  • Minnesota: 1 player (Whalen)
  • The first 11 members of the 2012 U.S. Olympic Women’s Basketball Team that will go to London seeking an unprecedented fifth straight gold medal were announced today by USA Basketball and includes the top stars from around the WNBA.

    The group features a trio of two-time Olympic gold medalists (Sue Bird, Tamika Catchings and Diana Taurasi), four athletes who have each earned one Olympic gold medal (Seimone Augustus, Swin Cash, Sylvia Fowles and Candace Parker) and four newcomers (Tina Charles, Angel McCoughtry, Maya Moore and Lindsay Whalen) to the Olympic stage.

    Below is a closer look at the deep and talented roster that will suit up in the Red, White and Blue this summer in London.


    Guards

    Sue Bird

    International Resume
    Gold Medals: 2010 FIBA World Championship, 2009 UMMC Ekaterinburg International Invitational, 2008 Olympic Games, 2008 FIBA Diamond Ball Tournament, 2007 FIBA Americas Championship, 2004 Olympics, 2002 World Championship, 2002 Opals World Challenge, 2000 R. William Jones Cup.
    Silver Medals: 2007 FIBA World League Tournament.
    Bronze Medals: 2006 FIBA World Championship.

    Analysis
    The consummate point guard in the women’s game, Bird has been an elite floor general everywhere she has played – from high school to college ball at UConn, to the professional ranks in Seattle and abroad, to a long history of success in international play with USA Basketball. A two-time gold medalist, Bird was mentored by Dawn Staley during the 2004 Olympics in Athens and took the reins as the starting point guard in Beijing in 2008. The U.S. never missed a beat and won its fourth consecutive Gold Medal. Bird is at her most comfortable when setting up her teammates, but has proven throughout her career to be a clutch shooter when her number is called in crunch time.


    Diana Taurasi

    International Resume
    Gold Medals: 2010 FIBA World Championship, 2008 Olympic Games, 2008 FIBA Diamond Ball Tournament, 2007 FIBA Americas Championship, 2007 FIBA Americas Championship, 2004 Olympic Games, 2000 Junior World Championship Qualifying Tournament.
    Silver Medals: 2007 FIBA World League Tournament. Bronze Medals: 2006 FIBA World Championship, 2001 Junior World Championship. Honors: 2006 & 2010 USA Basketball Female Athlete of the Year, named to the five-member 2010 All-FIBA World Championship Team, awarded the 3-point trophy at the 2006 World Championship, named to the five-member 2001 FIBA All-Junior World Championship Team, was the July 2001 USA Basketball Female Athlete of the Month.

    Analysis
    A fiery competitor that has found success at every level she has played, Taurasi is considered one of the best women’s basketball players of all time. An elite scorer – she’s won five WNBA scoring titles in her eight seasons in the league – she has unlimited shooting range and the ability to explode at any time offensively. The two-time gold medalist is far more than a scorer, as she possesses a complete all-around game on both ends of the floor. She is an excellent facilitator on offense and an underrated defender.


    Lindsay Whalen

    International Resume
    Gold Medals: 2010 FIBA World Championship, 2003 FIBA World Championship For Young Women (U21), 2002 World Championship For Young Women Qualifying Tournament (U20).

    Analysis
    Whalen makes her Olympic debut in London and provides a second elite point guard to back up Sue Bird. The University of Minnesota grad most recently helped lead her hometown Lynx to their first WNBA title, showing her skills as a facilitator and game manager while surrounded by talented players such as fellow Olympians Maya Moore and Seimone Augustus.


    Forwards

    Seimone Augustus

    International Resume
    Gold Medals: 2008 Olympics, 2008 FIBA Diamond Ball Tournament, 2007 FIBA Americas Championship, 2006 Opals World Challenge, 2005 World University Games, 2003 FIBA World Championship For Young Women.
    Silver Medals: 2007 FIBA World League Tournament.
    Bronze Medals: 2006 FIBA World Championship. Honors: 2003 USA Basketball Female Athlete of the Year, MVP of the 2003 FIBA World Championship For Young Women (U21)

    Analysis
    The 2011 WNBA Finals MVP will make her second straight Olympic appearance this summer,having won a Gold Medal in Beijing as a role player off the bench. Augustus is one of the best offensive players in the game with the ability to score from anywhere on the court, and is coming off a season that saw her overcome a series of devastating injuries to lead the Lynx to their first WNBA title in 2011. Back at full strength, Augustus reminded everyone of her abilities during the Minnesota run to the title – including a duel for the ages against Team USA teammate Angel McCoughtry.


    Swin Cash

    International Resume
    Gold Medals: 2010 FIBA World Championship, 2009 UMMC Ekaterinburg International Invitational, 2007 FIBA Americas Championship, 2004 Olympics.
    Silver Medals: 2008 Good Luck Beijing Tournament.

    Analysis
    The only player on the Olympic team with more than two WNBA titles, Swin Cash is making her second Olympic appearance for USA Basketball, having earned a Gold Medal in 2004 after averaging 6.3 points and 4.4 rebounds per game in a reserve role. Cash won two WNBA titles with the Detroit Shock and one with the Seattle Storm, and will suit up in 2012 for the Chicago Sky with fellow Olympian Sylvia Fowles. The two-time WNBA All-Star MVP is a do-everything wing player with the ability to score, rebound and defend.


    Tamika Catchings

    International Resume
    Gold Medals: 2010 FIBA World Championship, 2008 Olympic Games, 2008 FIBA Diamond Ball Tournament, 2004 Olympic Games, 2002 FIBA World Championship, 2002 Opals World Challenge, 1998 R. William Jones Cup, 1997 FIBA Junior World Championship.
    Silver Medals: 1997 COPABA Junior World Championship Qualifying Tournament (U18).
    Bronze Medals: 2006 FIBA World Championship.

    Analysis
    The reigning WNBA Most Valuable Player is the best two-way player in the league, impacting every aspect of the game on a nightly basis. She is arguably the best defensive player– that the WNBA has ever seen and the most intense player whenever she steps on the court.

    A two-time Olympic Gold Medalist, Catchings may not lead the team in scoring or rebounding, but she fills every category of the stat sheet in a way that few players ever have. A bench player in her previous Olympic appearances, Catchings will now play a more prominent role as one of only three veterans with two Olympics under her belt.


    Angel McCoughtry

    International Resume
    Gold Medals: 2010 FIBA World Championship, 2009 UMMC Ekaterinburg International Invitational, 2007 Pan American Games.

    Analysis
    The star of the Atlanta Dream makes her first Olympic appearance in 2012, but it is likely the first of many for this young talent. McCoughtry has led the Dream to the past two WNBA Finals and in doing so has emerged as one of the top scorers in the league. Catchings called McCoughtry the hardest player in the league to guard because of her unpredictability. She has the ability to score with the outside jumper, but can slash and get to the basket with the best of them, finding unique ways to score all over the court. An emotional player, McCoughtry is also a solid perimeter defender, and consistently ranks among the league leaders in steals.


    Maya Moore

    International Resume
    Gold Medals: 2010 FIBA World Championship, 2009 World University Games, 2007 FIBA U19 World Championship, 2006 FIBA Americas U18 Championship.

    Analysis
    The reigning WNBA Rookie of the Year re-joins her college coach after the two helped to compile the most prolific run in women’s basketball history, winning 90 straight games and two NCAA titles at the University of Connecticut. Moore possesses a great all-around game, with the ability to shoot the three, get to the basket for her own shot or to set up her teammates with her great court vision. The first-time Olympian helped lead the Minnesota Lynx to their first WNBA title in her rookie campaign and hopes to do the same as an Olympic rookie.


    Candace Parker

    International Resume
    Gold Medal: 2008 Olympics, 2008 FIBA Diamond Ball Tournament, 2007 FIBA Americas Championship, 2006 Opals World Challenge, 2004 Junior World Championship Qualifying Tournament (FIBA Americas U18 Championship).
    Bronze Medals: 2006 FIBA World Championship. Honors: Named to the 2008 FIBA Diamond Ball All-Tournament Team; named to the 2006 Opals World Challenge All-Tournament Team.

    Analysis
    Candace Parker possesses a unique skill set to go along with her size (6-foot-4) to make her one of the most versatile players in the WNBA. Her roster position says it all – G/F/C. Parker can play any position on the floor. She can do it all, from grabbing rebounds to running to the fast break, from crossing over a defender to finding an open teammate to finishing at the rim. She is the only player in WNBA history to win Rookie of the Year and MVP honors in the same year, but her time on the court has been limited due to a series of injuries and having her first child. When healthy, as she was for the 2008 Olympic team in Beijing, Parker is one of the top players in the game.


    Centers

    Tina Charles

    International Resume
    Gold Medals: 2010 FIBA World Championship, 2009 UMMC Ekaterinburg International Invitational, 2009 World University Games, 2006 FIBA Americas U18 Championship.
    Bronze Medals: 2005 Youth Development Festival. Honors: Named the 2009 USA Basketball Female Athlete of the Year.

    Analysis
    First-time Olympian Tina Charles is a double-double machine, setting the WNBA record in each of her first two seasons in the league. Charles is an elite rebounder and defender, who possesses a solid offensive game on the block and has range out to 20-feet on the perimeter. The 2010 Rookie of the Year out of Connecticut, Charles will look to dominate the glass and the paint when she makes her Olympic debut for her former college coach.


    Sylvia Fowles

    International Resume
    Gold Medals: 2010 FIBA World Championship, 2009 UMMC Ekaterinburg International Invitational, 2008 Olympics, 2008 FIBA Diamond Ball Tournament, 2006 Opals World Challenge, 2005 World University Games Silver Medals: 2008 Good Luck Beijing Tournament, 2003 USA Basketball Youth Development Festival

    Analysis
    The reigning Defensive Player of the Year and MVP candidate, Sylvia Fowles makes her second appearance in the Olympics looking to fill the shoes of four-time Olympic champion Lisa Leslie as the anchor in the frontcourt. During the 2008 Olympics in Beijing, Fowles came off the bench to lead the team in scoring (13.4 ppg) and rebounding (8.4 rpg) on their way to the Gold Medal. The 6-6 center is an elite defender in the post and has improved her offensive game every year as she just averaged a career-best 20 ppg in 2011.

    More »

    Video

    WNBA Defensive Player of the Year Presented by Samsung: Brittney Griner

    Phoenix Mercury’s Brittney Griner is the 2014 Samsung Defensive Player of the Year.

    Brittney Griner’s Top 10 Plays of the 2014 WNBA Season

    Here are Brittney Griner’s Top 10 Plays of the 2014 WNBA Season.

    Postgame: McBride and Young-Malcolm

    Sophia Young-Malcolm and Kayla McBride talk about Game 1 of the Stars' series with the Lynx.

    Postgame: Dan Hughes

    Dan Hughes speaks with the press following Game 1 of the Stars and Lynx Playoff series.

    Postgame: Moore and Whalen

    Maya Moore and Lindsay Whalen talk about the keys to a win in Game 1 for the Lynx.